Your Scottish Slang Scots Word O’ The Day: Crabbit

Sixth in a series
crabbit
(cra·bit) Dialect, chiefly Scot -adj.
1. ill-tempered, grumpy, curt, disagreeable; in a bad mood [esp. in the morning]. (Often used in “Ken this, yer a crabbit get, so ye are“). -n. See crab – one who by their nature or temperament conveys an aura of irritability.

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Doug
Husband & father with youngins; Presbyterian; Will devops for boardgames; Dadjoke Enthusiast; Longtime WordPress user; The failure mode of “clever” is...

4 Comments

  1. Crabbit is most certainly NOT slang Scots, which itself is not a dialect of English. Crabbit is a proper Scots language (leid) word. BTW, if writing in Scots there is no apostrophe after o (english ‘of’). The Scots word for ‘of’ is simply ‘o’ e.g. puss like a bag o spanners.
    Whilst I understand the knee-jerk reaction to locate Scots in a humorous setting (a symptom of the cultural cringe), we are long past the day when of Scots language and culture can be disguised as humour.
    You might want to have a look at http://www.dsl.ac.uk/ and http://www.scotslanguage.com/.
    Good luck

  2. Crabbit is most certainly NOT slang Scots, which itself is not a dialect of English. Crabbit is a proper Scots language (leid) word. BTW, if writing in Scots there is no apostrophe after o (english ‘of’). The Scots word for ‘of’ is simply ‘o’ e.g. puss like a bag o spanners.
    Whilst I understand the knee-jerk reaction to locate Scots in a humorous setting (a symptom of the cultural cringe), we are long past the day when ignorance of Scots language and culture can be disguised as humour.
    You might want to have a look at http://www.dsl.ac.uk/ and http://www.scotslanguage.com/.
    Good luck

  3. I guess that’s what you get when Yanks try to anglicise the Scots language?

  4. My Scots Mother, who died 30 years ago, was a frequent user of ‘crabbit’, so much so that it quickly comes to mind when faced with a grumpy old person in the morning who may be off their meds, even though I have never lived in Scotland. As an immigrant in the USA and England, she thought she was just speaking English.

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